The Enid Blyton Society

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Welcome to the website of the Enid Blyton Society. Formed in early 1995, the aim of the Society is to provide a focal point for collectors and enthusiasts of Enid Blyton through its magazine The Enid Blyton Society Journal, issued three times a year, its annual Enid Blyton Day, an event which attracts in excess of a hundred members, and its website. Most of the website is available to all, but Society Members have exclusive access to secret parts as well! Join the Society today and start receiving your copy of the Journal three times a year. Don't forget also that we have an Online Shop where you'll find back issues of the Journal as well as rare Enid Blyton biographies, guides and more.

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Posted by Miss JJ on January 23, 2017
Hi Enid Blyton web site. I'm doing a school project and would like to ask you to answer some questions. Did Enid go on adventures? Did she play music because I play piano, violin and guitar. Thank you!! (Age 7)
BarneyBarney says: Enid Blyton would have been interested to know that you play so many instruments, Miss JJ! She was a talented musician and her father wanted her to become a concert pianist. Enid Blyton had a place at the Guildhall School of Music but she turned it down to train as a teacher (she was a teacher for a few years before writing full-time). As a child, Enid Blyton used to like going for nature walks and bike rides which probably felt like going on an adventure. You can find out more about her life by clicking on our "Author of Adventure" button (over to the left of this page) and then on 'A Biography of Enid Blyton—The Story of Her Life'.
Posted by Shirley Murphy on January 23, 2017
"Enid Bottom"? I think that they were writing on their mobile and the autocorrect must've kicked in! Barney, when will it be OK to put the original Blyton text online for free?
BarneyBarney says: Enid Blyton's books will remain in copyright until the end of 2038.
Posted by Aminmec on January 20, 2017
I bought the Dean 90s edition of The Book of Naughty Children. While the cover has Eileen Soper's drawing, the stories inside are without any art. If I remember correctly the paperback editions had Eileen's drawings. What was the reason for Dean's omission of the interior art? It makes the book quite dull.
BarneyBarney says: It's a shame the illustrations have been removed. Publishers sometimes do that because they want to keep to a certain number of pages, or because they feel that the pictures look old-fashioned.
Posted by Lawrence Langton on January 17, 2017
Has Enid Bottom any connection with Bottom village in Lincolnshire?
BarneyBarney says: Eh? If you mean "Enid Blyton" and "Blyton village", Barbara Stoney says in Enid Blyton - the Biography: "Enid Blyton's early forebears are believed to have come over to England at the time of the Norman Conquest and to have settled in Lincolnshire, where the name appears under various spellings in many of the early chronicles for that county. There is a village called Blyton in the Lincolnshire Wolds and a chantry was founded in Lincoln Cathedral in 1327, apparently bequeathed by a de Bliton who was the mayor of the city four years earlier. For several centuries the family were concerned with farming or the wool and cloth trade - but George Blyton, Enid's great-grandfather, was a cordwainer." Barbara Stoney goes on to mention that George Blyton lived in Swinderby.
Posted by Charlotte on January 17, 2017
Hi, We are looking for a poem about a wooden horse of Troy and it has led us to this website a couple of times. Is it a poem that Enid Blyton wrote? I know it contains the line 'The men of Troy are simple folk and simple folk of course'. Would you know if it is one of hers and if so know the full poem? We are urgently trying to locate it to be read at a funeral. Any help would be much appreciated!
BarneyBarney says: It seems that the poem is by Hugh Chesterman and was published in The New Merry-go-round Volume 6, 1928 and A Bulletin for Schools Volume 30, 1936. Click on this link to find out more.

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