The Enid Blyton Society

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Barney
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Showing all messages from 2017...

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Posted by Aminmec on January 20, 2017
I bought the Dean 90s edition of The Book of Naughty Children. While the cover has Eileen Soper's drawing, the stories inside are without any art. If I remember correctly the paperback editions had Eileen's drawings. What was the reason for Dean's omission of the interior art? It makes the book quite dull.
BarneyBarney says: It's a shame the illustrations have been removed. Publishers sometimes do that because they want to keep to a certain number of pages, or because they feel that the pictures look old-fashioned.
Posted by Lawrence Langton on January 17, 2017
Has Enid Bottom any connection with Bottom village in Lincolnshire?
BarneyBarney says: Eh? If you mean "Enid Blyton" and "Blyton village", Barbara Stoney says in Enid Blyton - the Biography: "Enid Blyton's early forebears are believed to have come over to England at the time of the Norman Conquest and to have settled in Lincolnshire, where the name appears under various spellings in many of the early chronicles for that county. There is a village called Blyton in the Lincolnshire Wolds and a chantry was founded in Lincoln Cathedral in 1327, apparently bequeathed by a de Bliton who was the mayor of the city four years earlier. For several centuries the family were concerned with farming or the wool and cloth trade - but George Blyton, Enid's great-grandfather, was a cordwainer." Barbara Stoney goes on to mention that George Blyton lived in Swinderby.
Posted by Charlotte on January 17, 2017
Hi, We are looking for a poem about a wooden horse of Troy and it has led us to this website a couple of times. Is it a poem that Enid Blyton wrote? I know it contains the line 'The men of Troy are simple folk and simple folk of course'. Would you know if it is one of hers and if so know the full poem? We are urgently trying to locate it to be read at a funeral. Any help would be much appreciated!
BarneyBarney says: It seems that the poem is by Hugh Chesterman and was published in The New Merry-go-round Volume 6, 1928 and A Bulletin for Schools Volume 30, 1936. Click on this link to find out more.
Posted by Rina Rivai on January 15, 2017
Hi, I am from Indonesia. I am a big fan of Enid Blyton books. I still read her books though I am no longer a kid and don't have kids. Her books have been translated to Indonesian. That's why I can read them because I cannot speak English well. Her books were my Christmas presents.
BarneyBarney says: I'm glad you still enjoy the books as much as ever, Rina. Enid Blyton would be surprised to know how many adults around the world still love her wonderful stories and characters!
Posted by Maria Pia on January 6, 2017
Hi. I loved Enid Blyton. My books are 35 years old. Now my daughter and I are reading a book. The paper is yellow...but I love it. I hope my daughter loves these books as much as I did.
BarneyBarney says: Happy Reading to you and your daughter, Maria!
Posted by Adie on January 5, 2017
Did Enid Blyton ever visit Nottingham?
BarneyBarney says: I'm afraid I don't know.
Posted by Shrawan on January 4, 2017
Hi! Happy New Year 2017. Well, I have written some continuation books in St. Clare's and Malory Towers and I want them to be published. What can I do?
BarneyBarney says: Happy New Year! Continuation books by Pamela Cox already exist for those series. However, if you'd still like to try you'll need to contact Hachette UK as they own the Enid Blyton copyright. Here are their contact details.