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60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 12 May 2017, 17:15

Tony Summerfield wrote:We actually played an extract from one of the Australian Find-Outers radio plays at an EB Day, but I can't remember which one. Somewhere I have a schedule of the episodes which went on for several years on a weekly basis and I believe I am right in saying that they covered all the books apart from Banshee Towers. No, they didn't leave that out as they thought it was a poor book - it is just that it hadn't been written when the series ended in the late 50s! :D

It was at the 2009 Enid Blyton Day that Norman Wright played the first episode of The Mystery of the Burnt Cottage from the Australian radio series. In my write-up of the Enid Blyton Day (which incorporated comments from the forums) I wrote:

After a tea-break, Norman Wright played us the first episode of The Mystery of the Burnt Cottage from a long-running 1950s Australian Find-Outers radio series. It was hugely entertaining! The children playing the Find-Outers did their best to come across as "English" but Larry in particular had a very distinct Australian accent and Fatty sounded, as Norman put it, "like a middle-aged woman in tweeds" (or something like that!) Robert Houghton commented, "I've always imagined Goon to be very heavily Cockney, rather than the 'Rochdale' type accent he was given. It made him seem bumbling without any menace and I feel Goon could be menacing as well as daft!" Helen (221b) wrote of "Daisy sounding like she'd stepped out of a 'Cholmondley-Warner' Harry Enfield sketch and wandered into Crocodile Dundee!" The narrator who introduced the village of Peterswood described it as something akin to Trumpton-Chigley-Camberwick Green, full of jolly farmers building golden hayricks from sunrise to sundown. Did Norman really say that more than 400 episodes were recorded altogether, or did I mishear? I'd never imagined that so many were made!


Here's my full account of the Day on the website:

http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/day-2009-05-09.php
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

"There is no bond like the bond of having read and liked the same books."
- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Courtenay » 12 May 2017, 20:16

Anita Bensoussane wrote:After a tea-break, Norman Wright played us the first episode of The Mystery of the Burnt Cottage from a long-running 1950s Australian Find-Outers radio series. It was hugely entertaining! The children playing the Find-Outers did their best to come across as "English" but Larry in particular had a very distinct Australian accent and Fatty sounded, as Norman put it, "like a middle-aged woman in tweeds" (or something like that!) Robert Houghton commented, "I've always imagined Goon to be very heavily Cockney, rather than the 'Rochdale' type accent he was given. It made him seem bumbling without any menace and I feel Goon could be menacing as well as daft!" Helen (221b) wrote of "Daisy sounding like she'd stepped out of a 'Cholmondley-Warner' Harry Enfield sketch and wandered into Crocodile Dundee!"


:lol: :lol: :lol: :mrgreen: :wink:
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 12 May 2017, 23:53

Rob Houghton wrote: ...we have a real treat for people like Anita who can't get enough of Noddy. He hasn't been around in the magazine lately - but Anita, you'll be glad to know he's back - and you can read the story by following the link at the bottom of this post.

I've just read it and it's lame even for a Noddy story! Now Then Make-a-Fuss is rather better but not a favourite either. I did enjoy Beware Of The Bull though. It's a lively story and I like the idea of the boys playing at being Robin Hood and his Merry Men, casting votes, shooting down apples, etc. It sounds as though they have a lot of fun.

Rob Houghton wrote:Its always interesting to see adverts for books in the magazine - and books that aren't Enid's, in particular. I'm not really into 'Horse Books' but there are some more listed this week. Why I find it interesting is that while Enid's books are still selling by the thousands, these books seem to have completely disappeared...shows just how popular Enid still is.

Books like 'Jump for the Stars' by Gillian Baxter, or Rosina Copper and Rosina and Son by Kitty Barne, or Three of a Kind and Red Conker by Kathleen Mackenzie. I've never heard of any of these.

Yes, it's amazing how Enid Blyton has endured while so many other authors of her era have fallen by the wayside.

Rob Houghton wrote:Our News Sheet contains another anecdote from Enid about her Australian fans, when she tells us about one of her earlier trips to Dorset - As I have told you in my letter, members, I am away from home, and down by the sea - though actually I spend most of my time up on the hills. I play golf a good deal, and I think I really must tell FF Members of a funny thing that happened here once. I drove a ball very badly and it went onto the road and hit a parked car on the roof. Out popped two children, ran after the ball, and gave it back to me, all smiles. I suddenly saw they were wearing badges - FF badges - so I introduced myself, of course - and then discovered that they were Australian FF members, touring England with their parents. You can guess how thrilled we all were to meet so unexpectedly. I'm glad they were wearing their badges, otherwise I wouldn't have introduced myself of course. I always go up to any child wearing one of our badges - and you look SO surprised!

I love hearing Enid's tales of unexpected meetings with fans. The two children must have been over the moon to have the chance to chat to her face to face. I bet they couldn't wait to tell their friends!

Thanks as always, Rob and Tony, for the write-up and scans!
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

"There is no bond like the bond of having read and liked the same books."
- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 13 May 2017, 00:38

Thanks Anita! :-D Yes - I agree - the Noddy story was particularly lame even for a Noddy story!

Although I've always been a bit of a fan of Noddy, there are some stories, like this one, which I think might as well not have been written, lol! ;-)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 21 May 2017, 16:36

Image

Another fortnight gone past already! I can hardly believe how fast they go - and so here's the next Enid Blyton Magazine.

The cover shows an illustrations from the first story, A Lucky Afternoon which Tony has kindly scanned and added to The Cave. You can read it by following the link below. Its a good story - quite unusual - although similar ones have appeared before in the Magazine. Half-way though I suddenly thought 'I bet this is a true story' - and wasn't surprised to see, at the end, that it was. I particularly like the illustrations. Pity they are by an unknown artist. The style is very reminiscent of women's' magazines of the day.

In her editorial Letter - which can also be read in The Cave by following the link - we hear that ENid is now back home, and its good to hear news of her garden and life at Green Hedges - particularly about the heron. Also interesting to hear she keeps apples in her old shed - a bit like the Secret Seven shed...except I think they were onions!

After the cover story we have Our Letter Page with a selection of letters from the Sunbeam members. these detail how money was raised for the Sunshine Homes for Blind Babies - by making a hanging basket which was raffled and brought in 25 shillings, by embroidering handkerchiefs which made 10 shillings, and by selling home-made plaster figures, which actually raised £3!

After this, another uncollected short story - The Bit Of Ribbon - which can also be read by following the link to The Cave. Many thanks, Tony. Its a story that (I think?) is based on a famous fable...and has certainly been reused by Enid Blyton more than once. Its rather inconsequential in a way, unless you've never read any of the similar stories - but it teaches a good lesson! I also love the illustrations - by Sylvia Venus. They remind me of Amelia Jane, of course - but then so does the story. It could quite easily have been an Amelia Jane story in fact.

After the Ribbon story, we have a Painting Competition - and I'm always interested to see the great prizes on offer - THREE books by Enid Blyton for each winner - and there are three winners - one for each of three age categories. What a great prize!

Next, The Puzzle Page

here are a couple of the puzzles from this issue -
Sunbeams Puzzle -

Can you find the fruits hidden in the following sentences?

a) "Will you move that top lump of clay."
b) "Can I have my cap, please?"


Then we have The Famous Five Puzzle -

What am I?
Seven letters make this name of mine,
You'll find me on a railway line,
You might think I should be in bed,
But I'm more useful here instead.


Lastly The Busy Bees Puzzle -

Can you find the musical instrument hidden in the sentence below?

"Is the prisoner in his cell or not?"


:D Rumble and Chuff follow the Puzzle Page with the continuing picture-strip story about the Brownie and the train. Together they set off on their adventures into the big wide world, waving goodbye to the toys from the nursery window, and surprising the bunnies as they watch them go by. What fun! ;-)

Next - the continuing story of Secret Seven Mystery - chapter 17. No illustration this issue, which is a shame. In fact the chapter only covers three pages - must be quite a short chapter.

The next short story is Mr Twiddle Pays A Call and I think its my favourite story of this issue. I never really appreciated Mr Twiddle as a kid and consequently I haven't read many of his stories (something I must rectify!) - but I really love the atmosphere of them. They take you straight back to simpler times, to a way of life that is sadly gone, when people helped neighbours, tea was always on the table, gardens were always well-planted, and women wore nice hats! I'd never read this story before - but if you care to read it you can find it in Mr Twiddle Fetches Polly and other stories (Award 2003). Its an amusing story of Mr Twiddle going visiting, going to the wrong house and the wrong Mrs Brown, and being mistaken for an odd-job man! :lol: It has some great illustrations in the magazine version, too, by the originator of Mr Twiddle, Hilda McGavin. She makes Mrs Brown look extremely disagreeable!


The Birthday Kitten follows, with Chapter 2. I'm sure we're mostly familiar with this story, and if not, then its easy to buy a copy, as it has been republished many times. I must admit though that for me the Grace Lodge illustrations in the original version are the best illustrations. She's one of my most favourite illustrators of all time.

Our News-sheet follows, and I was quite sad to read some of the stuff Enid writes about her Children's Home patients. Makes us realise that things weren't always rosey for children in the past, just as today. Enid writes - Do you remember our backward little Mark? he has made such wonderful progress that he is now down with the toddlers. Will you believe it, we haven't heard one single word from his mother since we took him months ago! I am sure your mothers wouldn't forget you!

I also found it interesting to read about the requests that had been coming in for Famous Five Club ties I wonder if anything ever came of these, as I've never seen one for sale, or heard anyone mention them. Maybe they were too expensive, or not enough children requested one. Enid says - Hundreds of you have begged for ties with the badge of the FF club on them, so I have been making enquiries for you. I have found a manufacturer who will make them, with our badge on them - good washable ties - but he says he will only do so if enough of you want them. So would those who would like them please send me a card, and I will then see if it's possible to get the ties made. They would cost 4s. 6d, (Do not send any money now, please!)

And so we come to the end of another Enid Blyton Magazine. Hope you enjoy reading the stories! Follow the link below -
http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/magazine-details.php?magid=911

See you next time! 8)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Eddie Muir » 21 May 2017, 16:40

Thanks, Rob. Another superb post for me to enjoy this evening. :D
'Go down to the side-shows by the river this afternoon. I'll meet you somewhere in disguise. Bet you won't know me!' wrote Fatty.

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Kate Mary » 21 May 2017, 19:21

Thank you Rob. I'm sure it was an age between issues for the original readers but they seem to come along thick and fast to me. It's a great pleasure to read uncollected stories but I think I enjoy Enid's editorial letter most of all.
"I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wine."

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 21 May 2017, 19:23

Thanks both! yes, I agree - the editorial letters are always worth reading. I love hearing about life at Green hedges etc. :-)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby pete9012S » 21 May 2017, 21:54

Most enjoyable.Many thanks Rob & Tony.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 21 May 2017, 22:01

Rob Houghton wrote:The cover shows an illustrations from the first story, A Lucky Afternoon which Tony has kindly scanned and added to The Cave. You can read it by following the link below. Its a good story - quite unusual - although similar ones have appeared before in the Magazine. Half-way though I suddenly thought 'I bet this is a true story' - and wasn't surprised to see, at the end, that it was. I particularly like the illustrations. Pity they are by an unknown artist. The style is very reminiscent of women's' magazines of the day.

Yes, I like the stylish illustrations and the characters' expressive faces. It's a great story, very positive and full of generosity. How lovely that it's based on fact. I once found two four-leaved clovers on the same afternoon but Freda must have hunted extremely hard to find so many - not to mention some with five or six leaves.

Rob Houghton wrote:The next short story is Mr Twiddle Pays A Call and I think its my favourite story of this issue. I never really appreciated Mr Twiddle as a kid and consequently I haven't read many of his stories (something I must rectify!) - but I really love the atmosphere of them. They take you straight back to simpler times, to a way of life that is sadly gone, when people helped neighbours, tea was always on the table, gardens were always well-planted, and women wore nice hats!

I always enjoyed the Mr. Twiddle stories but I think I appreciate them even more as an adult than I did as a child. I love the scenes of affection between Twiddle and his wife (there are quite a few tender moments even though they exasperate one another much of the time!) and it's endearing to see Twiddle's unhurried enjoyment of everyday things such as reading the newspaper, buying sweets, going on a walk or watching the boats on the river. For all his muddles, he somehow seems very believable.

Rob Houghton wrote:Our News-sheet follows, and I was quite sad to read some of the stuff Enid writes about her Children's Home patients. Makes us realise that things weren't always rosey for children in the past, just as today. Enid writes - Do you remember our backward little Mark? he has made such wonderful progress that he is now down with the toddlers. Will you believe it, we haven't heard one single word from his mother since we took him months ago! I am sure your mothers wouldn't forget you!

What sad lives some of these youngsters led. I believe the children's home only took boys and girls under five, most of whom were there for relatively short periods, so Enid Blyton probably didn't get to hear how most of them fared as the years passed.

It's good to hear of the new slide for which money was raised by Famous Five Club members.

Interesting about the proposed Famous Five ties. Perhaps nothing came of the idea as you said, Rob.
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

"There is no bond like the bond of having read and liked the same books."
- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby sixret » 22 May 2017, 09:40

Thank you so much, Rob and Tony.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 22 May 2017, 11:52

Anita Bensoussane wrote: I once found two four-leaved clovers on the same afternoon but Freda must have hunted extremely hard to find so many - not to mention some with five or six leaves.



We had a caravan at Fradley Junction, south Staffordshire, in the 1990's and I once found about six four-leaf clovers there - the most I've ever found, in an area by the canal of maybe just five feet of grass. :-D I still have a couple of them, which I stuck onto card and covered with plastic. :-D
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Courtenay » 22 May 2017, 12:00

I just realised I have some catching up to do, as I hadn't posted my thoughts on the stories from last fortnight! Sorry for taking your thread back into the past a little, Rob — I'll be quick about it... :wink:

Beware of the Bull was an interesting story and certainly a fine Blytonesque indictment of cowardice! :lol: I must admit I thought at first the other boys were being mean, ganging up on Geoffrey and saying they'd never seen him do anything courageous — I assumed the story would show him going and doing something genuinely brave to prove himself. But no, the story showed he really was a coward and he got his just deserts for it. I thought he was particularly cruel for kicking Daisy the cow, too! :shock:

I totally agree with everyone else's assessment of Noddy and the Balloons as a rather annoying story. Not to mention the inconvenient fact that those balloons couldn't have carried anything along, let alone a toy car with passengers, unless Noddy and the clown exhaled helium!! :lol: :P

Now Then, Make-a-Fuss was also a little disappointing; I'm afraid I expect stories with a wizard as the main character to have at least a bit of magic come into play somewhere. This one didn't — as Rob said, it could just as easily have been Mr Meddle or Mr Twiddle, two Blyton characters who've never really grabbed me.

Now on to the current magazine! :D

I enjoyed A Lucky Afternoon and it was lovely to know it was based on a true story, although I find it a little amusing that people would pay good money just for clover leaves! But obviously they did. I hope none of them asked for their money back if they didn't get the good luck they expected!! :mrgreen:

Also interesting to hear of Bob, the boy in the story, making jigsaws with his fretsaw. I'm guessing he must have pasted pictures onto a wooden board and then sawed them into puzzle pieces. We used to do that as kids, but only with cardboard and scissors!

The Bit of Ribbon was another story that didn't really grab me — as Rob says, the basic theme is an old one. I'm sure Enid did another version of it in which two children are squabbling over who has the longer length of liquorice, so a cleverer character (an older boy, I think) bites a bit off each piece in turn, making them still uneven each time, until he's eaten the whole of it! :wink: I find that version more satisfactory somehow.

Thanks as always, Rob, for your summaries of the other parts of the magazines and Tony for your good scanning work. They're always a treat to read. :D
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 22 May 2017, 12:07

Thank you for the detailed feedback and thoughts - it really brings the thread alive to hear what people made of this fortnight's issue!
:D
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 23 May 2017, 08:19

Courtenay wrote:Also interesting to hear of Bob, the boy in the story, making jigsaws with his fretsaw. I'm guessing he must have pasted pictures onto a wooden board and then sawed them into puzzle pieces. We used to do that as kids, but only with cardboard and scissors!

We used to make jigsaws the same way as you, Courtenay. I once made a Find-Outers one based on the Mary Gernat cover for The Mystery of the Missing Man.

I remember asking my parents for a saw and some plywood, having seen a simple project in an old children's book that I wanted to try. It might have been in Arthur Mee's The Children's Encyclopedia. However, they wouldn't let me use a saw so I had to give up the idea.

Courtenay wrote:The Bit of Ribbon was another story that didn't really grab me — as Rob says, the basic theme is an old one. I'm sure Enid did another version of it in which two children are squabbling over who has the longer length of liquorice, so a cleverer character (an older boy, I think) bites a bit off each piece in turn, making them still uneven each time, until he's eaten the whole of it! :wink: I find that version more satisfactory somehow.

The play 'The Currant Bun' is very similar, from Enid Blyton's Book of the Year. My sister, two friends and I once acted it out as part of a show for family and neighbours.
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

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